Architecting Backup Infrastructure for Dynamic Workloads in the Cloud

Recently I had to design the backup infrastructure for cloud workloads for a client in order to ensure that we comply with the Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery standards they have set. However, following traditional IT practices in the cloud quite often poses certain challenges. The scenario that we had to satisfy is best shown in the picture below:

Agent-Based Backup Architecture

The picture is quite simple:

  1. Application servers have a backup agent installed
  2. The backup agent submits the data that needs to be backed up to the media server in the cloud
  3. The cloud media server submits the data to the backup infrastructure on premise, where the backups are stored on long-term storage according to the policy

This is a very standard architecture for many of the current backup tools and technologies.

Some of the specifics in the architecture above are that:

  • The application servers and the cloud media server exist in different accounts or VPCs if we use AWS terminology or virtual networks or subscriptions if you consider Microsoft Azure terminology
  • The connectivity between the cloud and on-premise is established through DirectConnect or ExpressRoute and logically those are also considered separate VPCs or virtual networks

This architecture would be perfectly fine if the application servers were long-lived, however, we were transitioning the application team to a more agile DevOps process, which meant that they will use automation to replace the application servers with every new deployment (for more information take a look at the Blue/Green Deployment White Paper published on our company’s website). This, though, didn’t fit well with the traditional process that the IT team, managing the on-premise Netbackup infrastructure, uses.  The main issue was that every time one of the application servers gets terminated, somebody from the on-prem IT team will get paged for failed backup, and trigger an unnecessary investigation.

One option for solving the problem, presented to us by the on-premise IT team, was to use traditional job scheduling solutions to trigger script that will create the backup and submit it to the media server. This approach doesn’t require them to manually whitelist the IP addresses of the application server into their centralized backup tool, and will not generate error event but involved additional tools that would require much more infrastructure and license fees. Another option was to keep the old application servers running longer so that the backup team has enough time to remove the IPs from the white-list. This, though, required manual intervention on both sides (ours and the on-prem IT team) and was prone to errors.

The approach we decided to go with required a little bit more infrastructure but was fully automatable and was relatively cheap compared to the other two options. The picture below shows the final architecture.

The only difference here is that instead of running the backup agents on the actual application instances, we run just one backup agent on a separate instance that has an unlimited lifespan and doesn’t get terminated with every release. This can be a much smaller instance than the ones used for hosting the application, which will save some cost, and its role is only for hosting the backup agent, hence no other connections to it should be allowed. The daily backups for the applications will be stored on a shared drive that is accessible on the instance hosting the agent, and this shared drive is automatically mounted on the new instances during each deployment. Depending on whether you deploy this architecture in AWS or Azure, you can use EFS or Azure Files for the implementation.

Here are the benefits that we achieved with this architecture:

  • Complete automation of the process that supports Blue/Green deployments
  • No changes in the already existing backup infrastructure managed by the IT team using traditional IT processes
  • Predictable, relatively low cost for the implementation

This was a good case study where we bridged the modern DevOps practices and the traditional IT processes to achieve a common goal of continuous application backup.